Oh, I see! moments
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A Very English
Holiday Ramble

by Joyce McGreevy on December 12, 2017

For Revelers with Wanderlust

Albemarle Street, London inspires wanderlust for an English holiday ramble. (Image © Joyce McGreevy)

Albermarle Street in London inspires holiday wanderlust.
© Joyce McGreevy

On a cold December morning, the London sky is gray, the sunlight as stingy as the fire in Scrooge’s counting-house. But the air is fresh, our hearts are filled with festive wanderlust, and we’re off on a Very English Holiday Ramble. Come join us in search of “Oh I see” moments, magic, and a seasonal surprise.

An Airbnb flat in Elephant and Castle, London inspires wanderlust for an English holiday ramble. (Image © Joyce McGreevy)

Holiday flats are charming (and rents less alarming) south of the Thames.
© Joyce McGreevy

The Hidden Hearts of Bruges

by Joyce McGreevy on November 28, 2017

Bruges by night inspires the writer in Belgium, where being bilingual is just the beginning. (Image © Joyce McGreevy)

Bruges by night is safe and serene.
© Joyce McGreevy

Where Being Bilingual
Is Just the Beginning

So, you’ve practiced your French to visit Belgium. Well, not so fast! Here, being bilingual is just the beginning. In this country the size of Maryland, only 40% of the population speaks French.

The Other 60 Percent

Now how’s your Flemish? Because we’re bound for Bruges. Known locally as Brugge, it’s arguably Europe’s most picturesque small city.

ruges is a World Heritage city in Belgium, where being bilingual is just the beginning. (Image © Joyce McGreevy)

This World Heritage city welcomes 7.5 million visitors a year.
© Joyce McGreevy

“Blistering Blue Brussels, Tintin!”

by Joyce McGreevy on November 6, 2017

The Tintin mural in Brussels, Belgium showcases comic book art as a cultural tradition. (Image © Joyce McGreevy)

Hugely popular in Belgium, Tintin and friends race down a wall in Brussels’ Rue de l’Etuve.
© Joyce McGreevy

Where Comic Books Are
a Cultural Tradition

Remember watching Saturday morning cartoons and reading Sunday’s comic strips? Settling in to reread stockpiled comic books? And how your parents—those draconian disciplinarians—made you go outside to play?

In Brussels, you can have your comics and play outside, too. Just follow the Comic Book Route.

The Léonard mural by Turk in Brussels shows why comic books are a cultural tradition in Belgium. (Image © Joyce McGreevy)

Léonard, a zany caricature of da Vinci by cartoonist “Turk,”
paints Brussels’ Palais de Justice.
© Joyce McGreevy

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