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White Box Plus Inspiration Equals Surreal Dreamscape

by Bruce Goldstone on June 30, 2014

A surreal dreamscape created by Jee Young Lee inside her small studio, revealing how imagination and creativity can expand limitations. (© Jee Young Lee, courtesy of Opiom Gallery)

Panic Room
© Jee Young Lee, courtesy of Opiom Gallery

Jee Young Lee’s Imagination Bursts the Limits of a Tiny Studio

In Jee Young Lee’s talented hands, an empty white box becomes the blank page on which the artist creates a surprising self portrait. Using paint and everyday materials, she transforms the small space into a surreal dreamscape.

When the room is ready, she carefully arranges the lighting, walks into her set, and snaps a single portrait.

Then she clears the space and does it again.

A surreal dreamscape created by Jee Young Lee inside her small studio, revealing how imagination and creativity can expand limitations. (© Jee Young Lee, courtesy of Opiom Gallery)

Monsoon Season
© Jee Young Lee, courtesy of Opiom Gallery

Hey, Could You Please Block My View of This Mural?

by Bruce Goldstone on May 12, 2014

Mural in Buenos Aires, Argentina, illustrating how street art appreciation thrives on interactions with the public. (Image © Bruce Goldstone)

Thumbing his nose at the rules of art appreciation?
© Bruce Goldstone

Obstructions and Street Art Appreciation

Like many photographers, my eye is constantly drawn to vibrant murals and colorful street art. I often stake out a spot in front of an exuberant wall and wait for the perfect, pristine moment to capture the image.

Art appreciation guidelines suggest that the artist’s message is best interpreted with as little interference as possible between you and the art.

Do Wind-Up Toys Have Inner Artists?

by Bruce Goldstone on May 1, 2014

Artwork created by a tin toy showing how wind-up toys can unleash creative expression. (Image © Echo Yang)

Guess what the artist was thinking. Now guess again.
© Echo Yang

Creative Expression Unleashed with the Turn of a Key

When we look at art, we often try to imagine what the artist was thinking: How is this artwork a creative expression of the artist’s thoughts and feelings? Take, for example, this vibrant starburst of primary dots. What did the artist have in mind?

In this case, chances are pretty good that the artist didn’t have anything in mind at all. That’s because the artist was a tin wind-up toy. Wind-up toys are great, but great thinkers they’re not.

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